Gasoline prices go up again

Screenshot The HuffPost According to the government indicator that follows the evolution of the cost of petroleum products, fuels experienced a sharp rise in prices at the beginning of October.

Screenshot The HuffPost

According to the government indicator that follows the evolution of the cost of petroleum products, fuels experienced a sharp rise in prices at the beginning of October.

ENERGY CRISIS – More scarce and more expensive fuels. This is the conclusion that can be drawn from the latest publication of the government indicator that follows the evolution of the prices of petroleum products, which comes at a time when shortages at service stations are becoming more acute and which is brought together by Élisabeth Borne this Monday, October 10 several ministers in Matignon to try to move towards a way out of the crisis.

As you can See it in our chart below.After several weeks of falling prices since the end of August, fuel prices rose again dramatically in early October. With diesel in particular, which is sold on average at more than 1.80 euros per liter in France, that is, an increase of almost 11 cents between the figures of September 30 and those of October 7.

This means that with such an increase, diesel returns to levels it had not reached since the end of August, just before the increase from September 1 of the state-funded discount at the pump to 30 cents per litre, and the implementation of the 20 – One-cent rebate from TotalEnergies, which caused an influx of motorists to its service stations.

Social conflict and global price spikes

And if diesel is now the most expensive fuel sold, gasoline products are not far behind in terms of growth. Between September 30 and October 7, the Super SP98 went from 1.62 euros per liter to 1.68; Super SP95 from 1.57 to 1.64 and Super SP95-E10 from 1.52 to 1.59 (with an increase of 7.3 cents per liter in one week).

As a reminder, the Ministry for the Ecological Transition updates its oil product price indicator every Friday thanks to a weekly survey of prices at the pump according to the different distributors.

This rise in prices comes, therefore, at a time when the fuel shortage affects almost a third of the stations in the territory, all the groups together, due to a social conflict in the refineries. The rise in prices is also part of a global context of rising oil prices after the decision of the cartel of exporting countries and their allies, united in OPEC+, to reduce their future production to support prices. The barrel of Brent and that of WTI, two key indicators, reached maximums on Monday not seen since the end of August.

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