“Orgasmiq”, “What a time! »… French television finally talks about sexuality without cache-sex

On television, we are finally starting to call things by their names and a cat by a vulva. For decades, sexuality on the small screen had to be confined to the sometimes brazen, sometimes sensationalist, sometimes pornographic record: the famous “first Saturday of the month on Canal+”. In other words, when the shows weren’t talking about it, they were talking badly or not really, which amounts to the same thing.

But things are changing. For two years now, the “sexual expert” Maïa Mazaurette has been writing a column on the subject in Daily, in TMC. This same channel will broadcast its documentary on Wednesday Desire: what men want, an exploration of the male libido through multiple testimonies and stories. Tuesday, Téva launches, at 9 pm, orgasmic, a talk show hosted by Rosa Bursztein. The theme of the first number: “Do you have to enjoy to be happy? “The following will be about polyamory, desire or even fantasies…

And then every Saturday at what a time! on France 2, Camille Aumont Carnel opens her sex club to answer questions about sex from the public… For example: “Why, when I have sex, can I never orgasm without touching myself? » or « I realized that my sex did not look like the ones you can find in porn. It gives me complexes. It is normal ? »

“Good morals and censorship”

Most of these questions come from the community that Camille Aumont Carnel has created through her Instagram account, @jemenbatsleclito, followed by almost 700,000 people. “So, I approach sexuality in a hyper uninhibited and cash way. I receive about 300 messages a day”, says the author. And to clarify: “I am not a sexologist, I am not a journalist, I am not a midwife, I am not a gynecologist. soy camila The fact of being identified as a person to whom we can ask questions and who will answer them very honestly is nothing new. What’s new is putting it on public service television on a Saturday night and talking about it that way. »

He says that the producer of what a time!Régis Lamanna-Rodat, contacted her because “it was important for her, in her desire to address contemporary issues, to leave space to talk about sexuality, to see where the sexuality of French women and men is in the post-# metoo. »

“Television must revolutionize and progress,” says Rosa Bursztein. If the programs on sexuality did not exist, it was for reasons of morality, of censorship. It is not for nothing that people have turned to social media. Suddenly, there was a word that was super free”, emphasizes the host oforgasmic. She is also joined around the table by Téva Charline Vermont and Charline Gayault, whose Instagram accounts @orgasme_et_moi (657,000 subscriptions) and @charline.sagefemme (132,000 subscriptions) reference her.

“If you are interested, it is because there is a lack of information”

As a result of #metoo, it seemed necessary to talk about sexuality in another way, to remember the notion of consent, to open up reflections on heteronormativity or patriarchal dynamics… Camille Aumont Carnel, who launched @jemenbatsleclito in October 2018, speaks of “revolution sexual 2.0 with hashtags”. According to her, it is logical that the paradigm shift observed on smartphone screens is now illustrated on television screens.

“I know that today the tendency is to say that television has nothing more to offer to anyone and that the desire is dead. But it is no coincidence that television is increasingly taking over the issue of sexuality. People are interested and if they are interested it is because there is a lack of information”, says Maïa Mazaurette when asked if it is important to talk about sex on television when the subject is mentioned a lot on social networks, in series, books or podcasts accessible by the public. greater number. “Television is consumed as a couple or as a family, while Instagram content is consumed personally,” she continues. It is not the same to receive sexual information when you are with your girlfriend, with your boyfriend, with your parents: you can raise a point or start a conversation. »

“There are people who do not want to be on the networks all the time, insists Rosa Bursztein. And then it’s not exactly the same content. A post is a bit short. Within orgasmic, witnesses come to tell life experiences, experts give extremely detailed analyses. There are two hours of discussion, it allows you to go deeper. »

Camille Aumont Carnel says the same: “Television allows you to reach another audience. With food, sexuality is the one issue we all have in common on Earth. But this topic is still very closed, taboo, misunderstood… It is very good to have the opportunity to address these issues, to advance mentalities, to inform, to build, to educate by making people laugh. »

freedom of tone

You are already seeing the impact of your appearances in what a time! “I’ve been stopped at least 10 times on the street in the last two weeks to say, ‘You have no idea how good it feels to see a girl like you talk about sex, especially this way, la.’ »

The freedom of tone is essential to talk about intimacy on the small screen. “I have no censorship of the channel or of the production, assures Camille Aumont Carnel. Doing something super diluted doesn’t work, it’s not me and it’s not what people want to see or hear. »

“Also on television you can go straight to the point, with images that speak, clear explanations, without ever falling into vulgarity or wanting to shock”, confirms Rosa Bursztein. His comedian profile in front of the podcast The boys I want to meetit was obvious for the production oforgasmic.

“Making jokes, downplaying the drama, talking about me laughing allows the witnesses to feel comfortable, creating a climate of discussion where everyone shares and accesses the most intimate words,” says who plays his only on stage, prohibited. for children under 12, at the Nouvelle Seine in Paris.

“The goal is not to say ‘fuck from morning to night'”

Disinhibit the public, that is the key word of the “sexpertes”. “I want to do good, so that people take a weight off their shoulders; the one of all those beliefs, of those moments in which we found ourselves strange, not in mold, not normal, in which we asked ourselves a thousand million questions wondering if it only happened to us”, summarizes the author of @jemenbatsleclito.

Her words echo those of Rosa Bursztein: “With orgasmic, we want someone watching to think “Oh, that’s normal actually and feel less alone.” I think that women have become enormously self-conscious about their bodies, about their ability to have pleasure. And to continue: “We want the greatest possible inclusion. We’ll talk about breaking pervasive norms, for example. We’ll talk about prostate pleasure. When it comes to sexual relations with objects, we will emphasize that they are relations that men can have with women, that women can have with each other… We want to break the mandates. The goal is also not to say “fuck from morning to night”, but rather that everyone feels free to explore sexuality without shame. »

“Sex is emotions, politics, economics…”

Maïa Mazaurette, who until then had been very alone in the air space, said she received “with joy what could be competition.” She explains: “When you’re out of the world of sexuality, you may think that a documentary or chronicle about sex is enough. But there are so many ways to see these things. Sex has to do with emotions, politics, the economy… The multiplicity of points of view gives more freedom to the people who receive the information. I give mine but I find it interesting that people do not agree with me, that other journalists have a very different analysis than mine, because we are always more intelligent and empathetic when we receive more ‘information’. »

And if the offer is now a little more numerous on television, there is still quite a margin before affirming that it saturates the grills of the programs. “If you compare the number of sex shows to the number of sports shows, that’s nothing. We are only at the beginning. I want it to be dynamic”, summarizes Maïa Mazaurette, happy “to work in a field where there are more and more new ideas, new objects”.

Camille Aumont Carnel, would see herself “embodying a public service television program talking about sexuality”, within “two or three years”. The sexual revolution on the small screen has only just begun.

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